Tere Albanese - Animal Instincts Publications - For the Love of All Animals and Their Stories     

Beluga Whales Get Sanctuary

Finally,  the large marine mammals, whales, are getting a sanctuary.

In my opinion, these are the most abused wild animals that should be in the wild. It's not that I don't believe that other captured wild animals do not suffer, and maybe in some environments they are just as abused. Actually, I don't want to see any wild animals in captivity. However, many animals do well in our updated zoos.  Lions are pretty lazy, especially the males. And their habitats can be replicated  fairly well. Grazing animals do well in captivity.  But how do you replicate the vast oceans of the world that whales travel.  The oceans  are another world. - another planet on our planet. Making matters worse, these aquatic animals live in tight family groups. When they are captured  they take the young whales away from their family pod, and the entire pod will follow the moving 

fenced-in-cage that is attached to the boats.  They follow for as long as they can , crying out to their sibling or child, and the captured one s cry out to their families that they are leaving behind. Heartbreaking hardly describes it.

The new sanctuaries are being built in Iceland.
Here's the story:


Two female beluga whales Little White and Little Grey will be the first inhabitants of the new whale sanctuary which is about to open next to the remote Icelandic island of Heimaey.

It is called the first beluga whale sanctuary in the world and locals are excited by the potential tourism boost the new sanctuary may bring, including a visitor
centre and boat trips into the bay.

"This is unique, this is the first time in the world they do it like this. So, we're very happy to be a part of it" says Iris Robertsdottir, the mayor of the Westman Islands.

Iceland's whaling industry has long drawn criticism from around the world, many hope the sanctuary will show another side to the sparsely-populated North Atlantic island.

Animal rights campaigners have praised the project, calling on other marine parks to release their whales and dolphins into similar natural environments.

"By developing seaside sanctuaries, we're able to offer these animals some semblance of a natural life that they've been denied for so long," says Theodora Iona, outreach coordinator for PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).

"Also, seaside sanctuaries offer more enriched space, far more diving depth that they've been used to and they're also able to do what they want to do when they want to do it.

"They won't be forced to perform ridiculous tricks for paying visitors. So, it's definitely a much, much better option for them."

Click on the video player above and take a look at Little White and Little Grey who are set to travel from Shanghai to Heimaey in spring 2019.


Two female beluga whales Little White and Little Grey will be the first inhabitants of the new whale sanctuary which is about to open next to the remote Icelandic island of Heimaey.

It is called the first beluga whale sanctuary in the world and locals are excited by the potential tourism boost the new sanctuary may bring, including a visitor centre
and boat trips into the bay.

"This is unique, this is the first time in the world they do it like this. So, we're very happy to be a part of it" says Iris Robertsdottir, the mayor of the Westman Islands.

Iceland's whaling industry has long drawn criticism from around the world, many hope the sanctuary will show another side to the sparsely-populated North Atlantic island.

Animal rights campaigners have praised the project, calling on other marine parks to release their whales and dolphins into similar natural environments.

"By developing seaside sanctuaries, we're able to offer these animals some semblance of a natural life that they've been denied for so long," says Theodora Iona, outreach coordinator for PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).

"Also, seaside sanctuaries offer more enriched space, far more diving depth that they've been used to and they're also able to do what they want to do when they want to do it.

"They won't be forced to perform ridiculous tricks for paying visitors. So, it's definitely a much, much better option for them."

Click on the video player above and take a look at Little White and Little Grey who are set to travel from Shanghai to Heimaey in spring 2019.